Course Catalog

Fire Officer II- FF51 Technical Certificate of Credit


Campus Locations: Online

Purpose: The Fire Officer II program prepares the student for a higher level leadership role within the fire service.

Curriculum: The curriculum includes Fire Prevention and Inspection, Service Safety and Loss Control, Administration Management, and Arson Investigation.

Careers: Fire Officers

Requirements:

  • Submit a completed application and application fee
  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Submit official high school transcript or High School Equivalency transcript or college transcripts showing successful completion of 60+ semester credits or 72+ quarter credits
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable
  • Present acceptable ACCUPLACER, ACT, ASSET, COMPASS, PSAT, or SAT scores or GED score of 145 or higher or have one of the following: an associate degree or higher or have a HOPE GPA of 2.6 after the completion of 10th grade. Documentation on a college transcript of successful completion of appropriate courses from a regionally accredited college or university may be accepted in lieu of test scores..

Additional Program Requirements:

  • Students should be graduates of of the Fire Officer I Technical Certificate of Credit before enrolling in this program.
Curriculum Outline (14 hours)
Occupational Courses 14
FRSC 1151

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Emphasis is placed on the shared responsibility of all fire service personnel to prevent fires and fire losses by survey of fire prevention activities, conducting basic fire prevention inspections, practicing life safety codes, review of local and state laws regarding fire inspection, and review of applicable codes and standards. Topics include: code administration, inspection, use and occupancy, building limitations and types of construction, fire resistive construction elements, installation of fire protection systems, mean of egress, interior finish requirements, general fire safety provisions, maintenance of fire protection systems, means of egress maintenance for occupancies, hazardous materials, flammable liquids and aerosols, detonation and deflagration hazards, hazardous assembly occupancies, other storage and processing occupancies, compressed gases and cryogenic liquids, pesticides and other health hazards, and using referenced standards. Successful completion of FRSC 1151 qualifies individuals to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Inspector Level-I examination

4
FRSC 1161

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to understand occupational safety and health and be able to develop safety programs. The course starts with an introduction to occupational safety and health and covers the history, national agencies that produce injury and fatality reports, and efforts that have been made to address safety and health problems in emergency service occupations. The course will review safety related regulations and standards and discuss how to implement them through risk management processes. There will be lectures and discussions on pre-incident safety, safety at fire emergencies, safety at medical and rescue emergencies, safety at specialized incidents, and post-incident safety management. Personnel roles and responsibilities will be covered, so that knowledge can be gained on the relationship to the overall safety and health program by the different responding and administrative personnel at emergency scenes. Lectures and discussions on how to develop, manage, and evaluate safety programs will be covered to provide general knowledge and basic skills on occupational health and safety programs. Finally information management and various other special topics will be covered to gain knowledge on the legal, ethical, and financial considerations that programs need to be aware of and how to collect the data and report it.

3
FRSC 2100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to become a diverse leader and manager in their department. The course starts with the history of the fire service which focuses on the historical events that have forged the fire service today. Discussions on preparing for the future are designed to provide information to develop a game plan for personal success. Leadership and Management principles will be taught to blend the academics of leadership and management research into what occurs in the fire service organization on a daily basis. Leadership styles will be discussed to help understand how to lead and manage and, as important, why it is done. The course will take an insightful look into how people handle change personally and organizationally. Discussions on ethics will be focused on the elements critical to ethical leadership and management practices. The course will explore the elements of team building and provide a depth of understanding how to blend various styles and personalities to get the most from people. Discussions on managing emergency services will target budgeting and personnel management the support elements that are so vital to every organization. Quality of the fire service will also be looked at for methods of quality improvement and their applications to improve the services delivered to citizens everyday. An in-depth overview of the changes in disaster planning and response since 9-11, and includes ways to help with community evaluation and preparedness processes. Finally, shaping the future will explore the possibilities of what may occur in the fire service and how you can play an important role in helping to shape the fire service of the future.

3
FRSC 2170

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Presents an introduction to Fire Investigation. Emphasis is placed upon: fire behavior, combustion properties of various materials, sources of ignition, and investigative techniques for - structures, grassland, wildland, automobiles, vehicles, ships and other types of fire investigation, causes of electrical fires, chemical fires, explosive evaluations, laboratory operation, techniques used in fire deaths and injuries, arson as a crime, other techniques, State and Federal laws, and future trends in fire investigative technology.

4
Faculty
Program Chair

Paramedic and Fire Science Program Coordinator
Valdosta Campus

Advisor

Fire Science Technology Instructor
Valdosta Campus

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