Course Catalog

Engineering Technology - ET33 Degree


Campus Locations: Valdosta
The Engineering Technology Program is intended to provide the opportunity for students to explore a career in engineering at the professional level. Program graduates will receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Technology, qualifying them as engineering technicians with a specialization in mechanical engineering technology, electrical engineering technology, or industrial engineering technology.

Requirements:

  • Submit a completed application and application fee
  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Submit official high school transcript or High School Equivalency transcript or college transcripts showing successful completion of 60+ semester credits or 72+ quarter credits
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable
  • Present acceptable ACCUPLACER, ACT, ASSET, COMPASS, PSAT, or SAT scores or GED score of 145 or higher or have one of the following: an associate degree or higher or have a HOPE GPA of 2.6 after the completion of 10th grade. Documentation on a college transcript of successful completion of appropriate courses from a regionally accredited college or university may be accepted in lieu of test scores.
Curriculum Outline (64 hours)
General Core Courses 16
Area I - Language Arts/Communication 3
ENGL 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Area II - Social/Behavior Science - Complete 3 Hours 3
HIST 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

3
HIST 1112

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century.

3
HIST 2111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

3
HIST 2112

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since 1980.

3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics - Complete 6 Hours 6
MATH 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
MATH 1113

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay.

3
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts - Complete 3 Hours 3
Additional General Education Core Requirement (3 Hours) 4
MATH 1131

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1113 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Topics include the study of limits and continuity, derivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications are incorporated from a variety of disciplines. Algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied.

4
Occupational Courses 25
ENGL 1105

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communications techniques, procedures, and reporting formats used in industry and business. Topics include reference use and research, device and process description, formal technical report writing, business correspondence, and technical report presentation.

3
DFTG 2010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Covers the basics of computer terminology, input and output devices, file formatting, file management, for CAD software. Introduces students to the fundamentals of geometric construction, scale reading line relationship and basic history of the drafting concepts. Student will also be introduced to basic and intermediate CAD commands and procedures, and drafting concepts and principals.

4
ENGL 1102

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
SPCH 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

3
PHYS 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 and (MATH 1112 or MATH 1113) w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1111L The first course of two algebra and trigonometry based courses in the physics sequence. Topics include material from mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, static equilibrium, elasticity theory, and simple harmonic motion), mechanical waves, theory of heat and heat transfer, and thermodynamics.

3
PHYS 1111L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 and (MATH 1112 or MATH 1113) w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1111 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS 1111. The laboratory exercises for this course include units of measurement, Newton's laws, work energy and power, momentum and collisions, one- and two-dimensional motion, circular motion and law of gravity, rotational dynamics and static equilibrium, elasticity theory, harmonic motion, theory of heat and heat transfer, thermodynamics, wave motion, and sound.

1
PHYS 1112

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 1111, PHYS 1111L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1112L The second of two algebra and trigonometry based courses in the physics sequence. Topics include material from electricity and magnetism (electric charge, electric forces and fields, electric potential energy, electric potential, capacitance, magnetism, electric current, resistance, basic electric circuits, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves), geometric optics (reflection and refraction), and physical optics (interference and diffraction).

3
PHYS 1112L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 1111, PHYS 1111L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): PHYS 1112 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS 1112. The laboratory exercises for this course include material from electricity and magnetism, geometric optics, and physical optics.

1
Choose One of the Following Chemistry Sequences (4 Hours) 4
CHEM 1151

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1151L Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurements and units, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

3
CHEM 1151L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1151 Selected laboratory experiments paralleling the topics in CHEM 1151. The lab exercises for this course include units of measurements, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

1
CHEM 1211

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1211L Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry and gas laws.

3
CHEM 1211L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): CHEM 1211 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1211. The laboratory exercises for this course include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and gas laws.

1
Specializations - Choose One of the Following (23 -24 Hours) 23
8E13 - Electrical Engineering Technology (23 Hours) 23
ENGT 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides a study of engineering technology as a career field and describes the knowledge and skills required for academic and occupational success. Topics include: engineering technology career, measurement and standards, mathematical operators, engineering tools, and engineering concepts. Labs reinforce mathematical, mechanical and electrical concepts through practical exercises, such as measurement and calculation of density of objects, relative humidity, use of digital multi-meter, building circuits, use of precision instruments, and team exercises.

3
ECET 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): MATH 1111, ENGT 1000 Emphasizes the knowledge and ability to analyze basic DC circuits and introductory concepts of AC circuits. Topics include: international units, basic electrical laws, series and parallel circuits, network analysis concepts, network theorems concepts, D.C. instruments, grounding techniques, magnetism, inductance/capacitance, transient analysis, and introduction to dependent sources and 2-port parameters. Laboratory work parallels class work.

4
ECET 2101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): ECET 1101, MATH 1111 Co-requisite(s): None Continues study of AC circuit analysis, which emphasizes complex networks. Topics include: analysis of complex networks, networks with multiple sources, AC network theorems, resonance, transformers, three-phase systems, filters and bode plots, non-sinusoidal waveforms, and pulse response of RLC circuits. Laboratory work parallels class work.

4
ECET 1110

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): ENGT 1000 Study of digital circuit fundamentals with an emphasis on digital electronics and techniques, simplification of logic circuits, sequential and combinational logic circuits, programmable logic devices, flip-flops and registers, binary number system, and arithmetic and logic operations. Laboratory work parallels class work using trainers, DesignWorks, and Altera simulation software and system.

4
ECET 2120

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the conduction process in semiconductor materials and devices. Topics include semiconductor physics; diodes; basic diode circuits and applications; biasing, stability and graphical analysis of bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors; introduction to silicon controlled rectifiers; device curve characteristics; and related devices with selected applications. Laboratory work includes circuit construction, use of appropriate instruments, troubleshooting and circuit simulation using P-SPICE.

4
Choose One of the Following (4 Hours) 4
ECET 2110

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): ECET 1110 Co-requisite(s): None Continues the study of digital systems with emphasis on the study of microcomputers with programming applications involving external devices with which the microprocessor/microcontroller must communicate. Topics include: logic families, PLD programming, microcomputer architecture, programming with arithmetic/logic instructions, jump, loop and call operations, I/O programming, timers, interrupts and interfacing techniques. Laboratory work parallels class work to include use of PLD (programmable logic devices) platforms, and microprocessor/microcontroller platforms to reinforce and edify theoretical concepts.

4
MATH 1132

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 4 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1131 with a "C" or better OR appropriate math placement test scores Co-requisite(s): None This course includes the study of techniques of integration, application of the definite integral, an introduction to differential equations,improper integrals, sequences, and series.

4
8I23 - Industrial Engineering Technology (24 Hours) 24
ACCT 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the basic financial accounting concepts of the complete accounting cycle and provides the student with the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a sole proprietorship. Topics include: accounting vocabulary and concepts, the accounting cycle for a personal service business, the accounting cycle for a merchandising business, inventory, cash control and receivables. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class.

4
MATH 1127

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the concepts and methods fundamental to utilizing and interpreting commonly used statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing chi square tests, and linear regression.

3
MEGT 1010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course introduces industrial manufacturing processes that employ processes for material shaping, joining, machining and assembly to the student. Topics include: casting, shaping and molding of metals, ceramics and polymers; particulate processing of metals and ceramics, metal forming, machining, sheet metal working, joining and assembling, surface treatment, and manufacturing design considerations. Emphasis is provided on raw materials, quality, and costs of finished products. The course includes lab exercises that demonstrate the applications of the topics covered in actual manufacturing processes.

3
Programming Course - Choose One of the Following (3 Hours) 3
CIST 1305

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None An introductory course that provides problem solving and programming concepts for those that develop user applications. An emphasis is placed on developing logic, troubleshooting, and using tools to develop solutions. Topics include: problem solving and programming concepts, structured programming, the four logic structures, file processing concepts, and arrays.

3
CIST 2341

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): CIST 1305 Co-requisite(s): None This course is designed to teach the basic concepts and methods of objected-oriented design and C#.Net programming. Use practical problems to illustrate C#.Net application building techniques and concepts. Develop an understanding of C#.Net vocabulary. Create an understanding of where C#.Net fits in the application development landscape. Create an understanding of the C#.Net Development Environment, Visual Studio and how to develop, debug, and run C#.Net applications using the Visual Studio. Continue to develop student's programming logic skills. Topics include: C#.NET Language History, C#.NET Variable Definitions, C#.NET Control Structures, C#.NET Functions, C#.NET Classes, C#.NET Objects, and C#.NET Graphics.

4
CIST 2361

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): CIST 1305 Co-requisite(s): None Provides opportunity to gain a working knowledge of C++ programming. Includes creating, editing, executing, and debugging C++ programs of moderate difficulty. Topics include: basic C++ concepts, simple I/O and expressions, I/O and control statements, arrays, pointers, structures, managing data and developing programs.

4
CIST 2371

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): CIST 1305 Co-requisite(s): None This course is designed to teach the basic concepts and methods of objected-oriented design and Java programming. Use practical problems to illustrate Java application building techniques and concepts. Develop an understanding of Java vocabulary. Create an understanding of where Java fits in the application development landscape. Create an understanding of the Java Development Kit and how to develop, debug, and run Java applications using the JDK. Continue to develop student's programming logic skills. Topics include: JAVA Language History, JAVA Variable Definitions, JAVA Control Structures, JAVA Methods, JAVA Classes, JAVA Objects, and JAVA Graphics.

4
Choose One of the Following (2 Hours) 2
LOGI 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Prerequisite: Program Admission Corequisite: None Provides a general knowledge of current management practices in logistics management. The focuses of the course will be on planning, organizing, and controlling of these activities, key elements for successful management in any organization. The course will also introduce student to Transport, Inventory, and Location strategies, Customer Service Goals and Organization and Control.

3
MEGT 1321

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 1 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None An introduction to machining and welding technology. This course will include emphasis of use and operation of selected machinery, various machining operations, selected welding processes and precision measuring instruments to be combined with laboratory projects and safety. Topics will include industrial safety and health practices; welding quality; use of cutting and grinding tools; introduction to welding terms and symbols; shielded metal arc welding (SMAW); gas metal arc welding (GMAW); gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW); basic machining operations; and precision measuring instruments.

2
XXXX xxxx Occupational Electives (9 Hours) 9
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