Course Catalog

Interdisciplinary Studies - AF53 Degree


Campus Locations: Valdosta, Ben Hill Irwin, Coffee, Cook
The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (AIS) allows customization of the program of study based on each student's academic and professional goals. The AIS requires completion of 61 semester credit hours (21 hours of general education requirements and 40 hours distributed among one or more areas of emphasis). Areas of concentration include education, public safety, business and computer/information technology, industrial/engineering technology, and health sciences. The program curriculum may be strategically selected to build upon the student's goals and objectives. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition or continued education. A student might choose an interdisciplinary studies program if his or her specific goals and interests cannot be met through a school's existing majors, minors and electives.

Requirements:

  • Submit a completed application and application fee
  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Submit official high school transcript or High School Equivalency transcript or college transcripts showing successful completion of 60+ semester credits or 72+ quarter credits
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable
  • Present acceptable ACCUPLACER, ACT, ASSET, COMPASS, PSAT, or SAT scores or GED score of 145 or higher or have one of the following: an associate degree or higher or have a HOPE GPA of 2.6 after the completion of 10th grade. Documentation on a college transcript of successful completion of appropriate courses from a regionally accredited college or university may be accepted in lieu of test scores.
Curriculum Outline (61 hours)
General Core Courses 21
Area I - Language Arts/Communication 6
ENGL 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Choose One of the Following (3 Hours)
ENGL 1102

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 1101 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
SPCH 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

3
Area II - Social/Behavior Science - Complete 6 Hours 6
Choose One of the Following (6 Hours)
ECON 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective.

3
ECON 2105

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic principles and policies. Topics include basic economic principles, macroeconomic concepts, equilibrium in the goods and money markets, macroeconomic equilibrium and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies.

3
ECON 2106

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Provides an analysis of the ways in which consumers and business firms interact in a market economy. Topics include basic economic principles, consumer choice, behavior of profit maximizing firms, modeling of perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition.

3
HIST 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

3
HIST 1112

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century.

3
HIST 2111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

3
HIST 2112

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since 1980.

3
POLS 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
PSYC 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics - Complete 6 Hours 6
Choose One of the Following (3 Hours)
MATH 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

3
MATH 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
Math or Science Option - Complete 3 Hours
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts - Complete 3 Hours 3
Occupational Courses 40
Complete 40 Hours from the Selected Courses Below 40
ACCT 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the basic financial accounting concepts of the complete accounting cycle and provides the student with the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a sole proprietorship. Topics include: accounting vocabulary and concepts, the accounting cycle for a personal service business, the accounting cycle for a merchandising business, inventory, cash control and receivables. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class.

4
ACCT 1105

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ACCT 1100 Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the intermediate financial accounting concepts that provide the student with the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a partnership and corporation. Topics include: Fixed and Intangible Assets, Current and Long-Term Liabilities (Notes Payable), Payroll, Accounting for a Partnership, Accounting for a Corporation, Statement of Cash Flows, and Financial Statement Analysis, Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class.

4
ACCT 1115

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 4 Lab - 0 Pre-requisite(s): ACCT 1100, COMP 2000 OR COLL 1010 Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes operation of computerized accounting systems from manual input forms. Topics include: company creation (service and merchandising), chart of accounts, customers transactions, vendors transactions, banking activities, merchandise inventory, employees and payroll, and financial reports. Laboratory work includes theoretical and technical application.

3
ALHS 1040

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: basic life support/CPR, basic emergency care/first aid and triage, vital signs, infection control/blood and air-borne pathogens.

3
AUTT 1010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-Requisites: None Co-Requisite: None Introduces basic concepts and practices necessary for safe and effective automotive shop operations. Topics include: safety procedures; legal/ethical responsibilities; general service; hand tools; shop organization, management, and work flow systems.

2
BIOL 2113

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2114

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2114L Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2114 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

1
BIOL 2117

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2117L Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.

3
BIOL 2117L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): (BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L) OR (BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2117 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.

1
BUSN 1410

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): COMP 2000 or COLL 1010 Co-requisite(s): None This course covers the knowledge and skills required to use spreadsheet software through course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Topics and assignments will include: spreadsheet concepts, creating and manipulating data, formatting data and content, creating and modifying formulas, presenting data visually and, collaborating and securing data.

4
BUSN 1440

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 6 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): BUSN 1100 or ability to key 25 gross words a minute on 3-minute timings with no more than 3 errors; COMP 2000 or COLL 1010 Co-requisite(s): NONE Reinforces the touch system of keyboarding placing emphasis on correct techniques with adequate speed and accuracy and producing properly formatted business documents. Topics include: reinforcing correct keyboarding technique, building speed and accuracy, formatting business documents, language arts, proofreading, and work area management.

4
CIST 1001

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides an overview of information systems, computers and technology. Topics include: Information Systems and Technology Terminology, Computer History, Data Representation, Data Storage Concepts, Fundamentals of Information Processing, Fundamentals of Information Security, Information Technology Ethics, Fundamentals of Hardware Operation, Fundamentals of Networking, Fundamentals of the Internet, Fundamentals of Software Design Concepts, Fundamentals of Software, (System and Application), System Development Methodology, Computer Number Systems conversion (Binary and Hexadecimal), Mobile computing.

4
CIST 1130

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides an overview of modern operating systems and their use in home and small business environments. Activities will utilize the graphical user interface (GUI) and command line environment (CLI This will include operating system fundamentals; installing, configuring, and upgrading operating systems; managing storage, file systems, hardware and system resources; troubleshooting, diagnostics, and maintenance of operating systems; and networking.

3
COMP 2000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture-3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-Requisites: Program Admission Co-Requisite: None This course provides an introduction to computer applications for the development of analytical and problem-solving workplace skills. The course introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Topics include file management, word processing software, database software, spreadsheet software, and presentation software skill development. The course also introduces terminology related to computer hardware, computer networks, and social and ethical concepts.

3
CRJU 1010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.

3
CUUL 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): MATH 1012 Provides an overview of the professionalism in culinary arts, culinary career opportunities, Chef history, pride, and esprit de corps. Introduces principles and practices necessary to food, supply, and equipment selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Topics include: cuisine, food service organizations, career opportunities, food service styles, basic culinary management techniques, professionalism, culinary work ethics, quality factors, food tests, pricing procedures, cost determination and control, selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Laboratory demonstration and student experimentation parallel class work.

4
ECCE 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces concepts relating the responsibilities and procedures involved in a variety of early childhood care situations. Topics include historical perspectives; professionalism; guidance; developmentally appropriate practices; learning environment (including all children); cultural diversity; and licensing, accreditation, and credentialing.

3
ELUT 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course will provide students with an overview of the electric power utility industry and occupational opportunities. Topics include the introduction and orientation to the electric utility industry, history of the industry, electric utility regulation and its scope, regulatory agencies and codes, general safety, electrical systems overview, electrical power generation, electrical transmission, electrical distribution, and electric utility career opportunities.

3
ENGT 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides a study of engineering technology as a career field and describes the knowledge and skills required for academic and occupational success. Topics include: engineering technology career, measurement and standards, mathematical operators, engineering tools, and engineering concepts. Labs reinforce mathematical, mechanical and electrical concepts through practical exercises, such as measurement and calculation of density of objects, relative humidity, use of digital multi-meter, building circuits, use of precision instruments, and team exercises.

3
FRSC 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course is a survey of the philosophy and history of Fire Protection, loss of property and life by fire, review of municipal fire defenses and the organization and function of the federal, state, county, city and private fire protection. Includes introduction to: fire technology education and the firefighter selection process; fire protection career opportunities; public fire protection; chemistry and physics of fire; public and private support organizations; fire department resources, fire department administration; support functions; training, fire prevention; codes and ordinances; fire protection systems and equipment; emergency incident management; and emergency operations.

3
HIMT 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course focuses on orienting the student to health information management. Topics include introducing students to the structure of healthcare in the United States and its providers, and the structure and function of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

3
HORT 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the fundamentals of plant science and horticulture as a career field. Emphasis will be placed on an industry overview; plant morphology; plant physiology; environmental factors affecting horticulture practices; soil physical and chemical properties; fertilizer elements and analysis; and basic propagation techniques.

3
IDFC 1007

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides an in-depth study of the health and safety practices required for maintenance of industrial, commercial, and home electrically operated equipment. Topics include: introduction to OSHA regulations; safety tools, equipment, and procedures; and first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

2
IDSY 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None This course introduces direct current (DC) concepts and applications. Topics include: electrical principles and laws; batteries; DC test equipment; Series, parallel, and simple combination circuits; and laboratory procedures and safety practices.

3
IDSY 1105

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None This course introduces alternating current concepts, theory, and application of varying sine wave voltages and current, and the physical characteristics and applications of solid state devices. Topics include, but are not limited to, electrical laws and principles, magnetism, inductance and capacitance.

3
IDSY 1170

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 1 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None This course introduces and emphasizes the basic skill necessary for mechanical maintenance personnel. Instruction is also provided in the basic physics concepts applicable to the mechanics of industrial production equipment, and the application of mechanical principles with additional emphasis on power transmission and specific mechanical components.

4
MCHT 1011

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the fundamental concepts and procedures necessary for the safe and efficient use of basic machine tools. Topics include: machine shop safety, terminology, use of hand and bench tools, analysis of measurements, part layout, horizontal and vertical band saw setup and operation, drill press setup and operation, and quality control.

4
MGMT 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Provisional Admission Co-requisite(s): None Develops skills and behaviors necessary for successful supervision of people and their job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on real life concepts, personal skill development, applied knowledge and managing human resources. Course content is intended to help managers and supervisors deal with a dramatically changing workplace being affected by technology changes, a more competitive and global market place, corporate restructuring and the changing nature of work and the workforce. Topics include: Understanding the Managers Job and Work Environment; Building an Effective Organizational Culture; Leading, Directing, and the Application of Authority; Planning, Decision-Making, and Problem-Solving; Human Resource Management, Administrative Management, Organizing, and Controlling.

3
MGMT 1105

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Provides a general knowledge of the human relations aspects of the senior-subordinate workplace environment. Topics include: employee relations principles, problem solving and decision making, leadership techniques to develop employee morale, human values and attitudes, organizational communications, interpersonal communications, and employee conflict.

3
MGMT 2115

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None This course is designed as an overview of the Human Resource Management (HRM) function and of the manager and supervisors role in managing the career cycle from organizational entry to exit. It acquaints the student with the authority, responsibility, functions, and problems of the human resource manager, with an emphasis on developing familiarity with the real world applications required of employers and managers who increasingly are in partnership with HRM generalists and specialists in their organizations. Topics include: strategic human resource management, contemporary issues in HRM: ethics, diversity and globalization; the human resource/supervisor partnership; human resource planning and productivity; job description analysis, development, and design: recruiting, interviewing, and selecting employees; performance management and appraisal systems; employee training and development: disciplinary action and employee rights; employee compensation and benefits; labor relations and employment law; and technology applications in HRM.

3
WELD 1000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None This course provides an introduction to welding technology with an emphasis on basic welding laboratory principles and operating procedures. Topics include: industrial safety and health practices, hand tool and power machine use, measurement, Oxyacetylene welding, and Welding career potentials.

4
Faculty
Program Chair

Dean for Academic Affairs/General Studies/Arts & Sciences
Valdosta Campus

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