Course Catalog

Radiologic Technician Assistant - RT21 Technical Certificate of Credit


Campus Locations: Valdosta
Purpose: The Radiologic Technician Assistant certificate program prepares students to assist the work of Radiographers, by contributing to clerical and technical duties. Curriculum: Curriculum includes classroom, laboratory, and clinical training in the instruction of taking and understanding the components of assisting in taking x-rays. Careers: Radiology Assistant

Requirements:

  • Submit a completed application and application fee
  • Be at least 17 years of age
  • Submit official high school transcript or High School Equivalency transcript or college transcripts showing successful completion of 60+ semester credits or 72+ quarter credits
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable
  • Present acceptable ACCUPLACER, ACT, ASSET, COMPASS, PSAT, or SAT scores or GED score of 145 or higher or have one of the following: an associate degree or higher or have a HOPE GPA of 2.6 after the completion of 10th grade. Documentation on a college transcript of successful completion of appropriate courses from a regionally accredited college or university may be accepted in lieu of test scores.

Additional Program Requirements:

  • American Heart Association Provider CPR Certification, physical examination, up-to-date immunizations, criminal background check and drug screen required prior to start of clinical rotation.

This program is a HOPE Career Grant eligible program for students who are HOPE Grant eligible. The Career Grant award is a fixed amount per semester based on the number of credit hours taken. Maximum award per term is $500.

Gainful Employment Information
Curriculum Outline (25 hours)
General Education Courses 6
Area I - Language Arts/Communication (3 Hours) 3
ENGL 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics - Choose One of the Following (3 Hours) 3
MATH 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.

3
MATH 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

3
MATH 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Math Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
MATH 1113

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1111 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay.

3
MATH 1131

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1113 w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): None Topics include the study of limits and continuity, derivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Applications are incorporated from a variety of disciplines. Algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied.

4
Occupational Courses 19
BIOL 2113

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab - 3 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, ENGL 1101 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.

1
BIOL 2114

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2114L Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114L

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 3 Pre-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L w/ a “C” or better Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2114 Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

1
ALHS 1090

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.

2
RADT 1010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 2 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: ethics, medical and legal considerations, Right to Know Law, professionalism, basic principles of radiation protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems, hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical college affiliation, medical emergencies, pharmacology/contrast agents, media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation, death and dying, body mechanics/transportation, basic life support/CPR, and patient care in radiologic sciences.

4
IMSA 1100

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 0 Lab 2 - 4 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): None Co-requisite(s): BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L, RADT 1010 Introduces students to the hospital clinical setting and medical office facilities with imaging services and provides an opportunity for students to participate in or observe radiographic and modality imaging procedures. Topics include: medical office and hospital protocol, film processing procedures, basic patient care, and radiation safety radiographic procedure responsibilities and office and film room procedures.

2
Computer Technology/Area II Option - Choose One Course Below 3
COLL 1010

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 2 Lab 2 - 0.5 Lab 3 - 2.5 Pre-Requisites: None Co-Requisite: None This course is designed to assist the learner to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic, personal, and professional success and to improve student retention. Areas of importance include Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Personal Financial Management, Stress Management and Wellness, Studying and Test Taking Skills, Communication Skills, Career Planning and Goal Setting, Computer Applications/Technology Skills and Employability/Professional Skills.

3
COMP 2000

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture-3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-Requisites: Program Admission Co-Requisite: None This course provides an introduction to computer applications for the development of analytical and problem-solving workplace skills. The course introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Topics include file management, word processing software, database software, spreadsheet software, and presentation software skill development. The course also introduces terminology related to computer hardware, computer networks, and social and ethical concepts.

3
ECON 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Program Admission Co-requisite(s): None Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective.

3
HIST 1111

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

3
POLS 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
PSYC 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

Weekly Contact Hours: Lecture - 3 Lab 2 - 0 Lab 3 - 0 Pre-requisite(s): Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores Co-requisite(s): None Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
Faculty
Advisor

Radiology Technology Clinical Instructor
Valdosta Campus

Advisor

Radiologic Technology Program Coordinator
Valdosta Campus

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