Courses in Professional Services

ARTS 1101: Art Appreciation

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : ENGL 1101
Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.

BARB 1000: Introduction to Barber/Styling Implements

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduction to Barber/Styling Implements is designed to give an overview of the barbering profession. Students are also taught the fundamentals of each barber/styling implement. Emphasis will be placed on the maintenance and care of each implement. Topics include: Barbering history, personality development, professional barbering ethics, and professional barbering image, safety, and reception and telephone techniques, nomenclature, types and sizes, proper use and care, and maintenance.

BARB 1010: Science: Sterilization, Sanitation, and Bacteriology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces fundamental theories and practices of bacteriology, sterilization, sanitation, safety, and the welfare of the barber/stylist and patron. Topics include: sterilization, sanitation, safety, bacteriology, and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance.

BARB 1022: Haircutting and Shampooing I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply basic haircutting techniques. Safe use of haircutting implements are stressed.
The course also introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo hair. Laboratory training includes shampooing a live model.
Topics include patron preparation, haircutting terminology, safety and sanitation, implements, basic haircutting techniques, shampoo
chemistry, and shampoo procedures.

BARB 1024: Haircutting and Shampooing II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply basic haircutting techniques. Safe use of haircutting implements are stressed.
The course also introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo hair. Laboratory training includes shampooing a live model.
Topics include patron preparation, haircutting terminology, safety and sanitation, implements, basic haircutting techniques, shampoo  chemistry, and shampoo procedures.

BARB 1030: Haircutting/Basic Styling

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Continues the theory and application of haircutting techniques and introduces hairstyling. Topics include: introduction to styling, client consultation, head and hair analysis, style cutting techniques, and implements for style cutting and tapering techniques.

BARB 1040: Shaving

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the theory and skills necessary to prepare and shave a patron. Simulated shaving procedures will precede practice on live models. Topics include: patron preparation, beard preparation, shaving techniques, once-over shave techniques, and safety precautions.

BARB 1050: Science: Anatomy and Physiology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Develops knowledge of the function and care of the scalp, skin, and hair. Emphasis is placed on the function, health, and growth of these areas. Topics include: cells, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, circulatory system, and related systems.

BARB 1060: Introduction to Color Theory/Color Application

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the fundamental theory of color, predispositions tests, color selection, and color application. Presents the application of temporary, semi-permanent, and permanent hair coloring products. Topics include: basic color concepts, skin reactions, the color wheel, color selection and application, mustache and beards, coloring products, safety precautions and tests, mixing procedures, color selection and application.

BARB 1072: Introduction to Chemical Restructuring of Hair

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course introduces the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent wave solutions and relaxers. It provide instruction in the application of permanent waves and hair relaxers. Precautions and special problems involved in applying permanent waves and relaxers will be emphasized. Application of perms and relaxers on live models is included. Topics include permanent wave techniques, safety procedures, chemical relaxer techniques, and permanent wave and chemical relaxer, application procedures on manikins, timed permanent wave, timed relaxer applications, safety precautions, and Hazardous Duty Standard Act.

BARB 1074: Advanced Chemical Restructuring of Hair

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course builds on the Introduction to Chemical Restructuring of Hair course to address advanced theory and practice relating to the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent waves and hair relaxers. It provides continuing instruction in the precautions and special problems involved in the application of permanent waves and relaxers. Application of perms and relaxers on live models is included. Topics include permanent wave techniques, safety procedures, chemical relaxer techniques, application procedures on manikins, times permanent wave, timed relaxer applications, and Hazardous Duty Standard Act.

BARB 1082: Advanced Haircutting and Styling I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course continues instruction in the theory and application of haircutting and styling techniques. Topics include elevation and design cutting, introduction to hairpieces, blow-dry styling, thermal waving and curling, advanced haircutting and styling; use of clippers, shears, and razor; permanent waving and styling; shaving techniques and beard trimming.

BARB 1084: Advanced Haircutting and Styling II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course continues instruction in the theory and application of haircutting and styling techniques. Topics include elevation and design cutting, introduction to hairpieces, blow-dry styling, thermal waving and curling, advanced haircutting and styling; use of clippers, shears, and razor; permanent waving and styling; shaving techniques and beard trimming.

BARB 1090: Structures of Skin, Scalp, Hair and Facial Treatments

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the theory, procedures, and products used in the care and treatment of the skin, scalp, and hair. Provides instruction on the theory and application of techniques in the treatment of the skin, scalp, and hair; and introduces the theory and skills required in massaging the face, preparing the patron for facial treatment, and giving facial treatments for various skin conditions. Benefits of facial treatments and massage will be emphasized. Emphasis will be placed on work with live models. Topics include: treatment theory, basic corrective hair and scalp treatments, plain facial, products and supplies, disease and disorders, implements, products and supplies, diseases and disorders, corrective hair and scalp treatments, facial procedures and manipulations, and safety precautions, theory of massage, preparation of patron for massage, massage procedures, facial treatment, types of facials, and facial treatment benefits.

BARB 1100: Barber/Styling Practicum and Internship

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting or in a combination of a laboratory setting and an approved internship facility. Topics include: haircutting/styling, hairstyling texturizing, shaving, beard trimming, thermal waving, hairpiece fitting and styling, safety precautions, and licensure preparation.

BARB 1110: Shop Management/Ownership

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the steps involved in opening and operating a privately owned cosmetology salon or barber/styling shop. Topics include: planning a salon/shop, business management, retailing, public relations, sales skills, client retention, and entrepreneurship.

BIOL 1111: Biology I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : BIOL 1111L
Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

BIOL 1111L: Biology Lab I

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : BIOL 1111
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1111. The laboratory exercises for this course include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, biotechnology, and evolution.

BIOL 1112: Biology II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L
Corequisite : BIOL 1112L
Provides an introduction to basic animal and plant diversity, structure and function, including reproduction and development, and the dynamics of ecology as it pertains to populations, communities, ecosystems, and biosphere. Topics include classification and characterizations of organisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, principles of ecology, and biosphere.

BIOL 1112L: Biology Lab II

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L
Corequisite : BIOL 1112
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1112. The laboratory exercises for this course include classification and
characterizations of organisms, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, principles of ecology, and biosphere.

CHEM 1151: Survey of Inorganic Chemistry

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : MATH 1101 or MATH 1111
Corequisite : CHEM 1151L
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurements and units, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM 1151L: Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Lab

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : MATH 1101 or MATH 1111
Corequisite : CHEM 1151
Selected laboratory experiments paralleling the topics in CHEM 1151. The lab exercises for this course include units of measurements, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM 1152: Survey of Organic Chemistry/Biochemistry

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1151L
Corequisite : CHEM 1152L
Provides an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. This survey will include an overview of the properties, structure, nomenclature, reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, ethers, halides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides; the properties, structure, and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes, as well as, intermediary metabolism. Topics include basic principles, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

CHEM 1152L: Survey of Organic Chemistry Biochemistry Lab

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1151L w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : CHEM 1152
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1152. The laboratory exercises for this course include basic principles of organic chemistry, hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, heterocyclic rings and alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids and fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and intermediary metabolism.

CHEM 1211: Chemistry I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : MATH 1101 or MATH 1111
Corequisite : CHEM 1211L
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry and gas laws.

CHEM 1211L: Chemistry I Lab

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : MATH 1101 or MATH 1111
Corequisite : CHEM 1211
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1211. The laboratory exercises for this course include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and gas laws.

CHEM 1212: Chemistry II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : CHEM 1212L
Continues the exploration of basic chemical principles and concepts. Topics include equilibrium theory, kinetics, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM 1212L: Chemistry II Lab

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite : CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : CHEM 1212
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1212. The laboratory exercises for this course include equilibrium theory, kinetics, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry.

COLL 1010: College and Career Success Skills

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course is designed to assist the learner to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic, personal, and professional success and to improve student retention. Areas of importance include Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Personal Financial Management, Stress Management and Wellness, Studying and Test Taking Skills, Communication Skills, Career Planning and Goal Setting, Computer Applications/Technology Skills and Employability/Professional Skills.

COMP 2000: Introduction to Technology & Computer Applications

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides an introduction to computer applications for the development of analytical and problem-solving workplace skills. The course introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Topics include file management, word processing software, database software, spreadsheet software, and presentation software skill development. The course also introduces terminology related to computer hardware, computer networks, and social and ethical concepts.

COSM 1000: Introduction to Cosmetology Theory

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Introduces fundamental both theory and practices of the cosmetology profession. Emphasis will be placed on professional practices and safety. Topics include: state rules, and regulations; state regulatory agency, image; bacteriology; decontamination and infection control, chemistry fundamentals, safety, Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance, and anatomy and physiology.

COSM 1010: Chemical Texture Services

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Provides instruction in the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent wave solutions and relaxers, application of permanent waves and relaxers. Precautions and special problems involved in applying permanent waves and relaxers will be emphasized. Topics include: permanent wave techniques, chemical relaxer techniques, chemistry, physical and chemical change, safety procedures, permanent wave and chemical relaxer application procedures, hair analysis, scalp analysis, permanent wave procedures (in an acceptable time frame), relaxer application (in an acceptable time frame), and Hazardous Duty Standards Act Compliance.

COSM 1020: Hair Care and Treatment

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Introduces the theory, procedures and products used in the care and treatment of the scalp and hair, disease and disorders and their treatments and the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo, condition, and recondition the hair and scalp.

COSM 1030: Haircutting

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply haircutting techniques, advanced haircutting techniques, proper safety and decontamination precautions, hair design elements, cutting implements, head, hair and body analysis, and client consultation.

COSM 1040: Styling

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to create shapings, pin curls, finger waves, roller placement, blow dry styling, thermal curling, thermal pressing, thermal waving, artificial hair and augmentation, and comb-outs. Laboratory training includes styling training on manikin. Topics include: braiding/intertwining hair, styling principles, pin curls, roller placement, finger waves, skip waves, ridge curls, blow dry styling, thermal curling, thermal pressing, thermal waving, artificial hair and augmentation, comb-outs, and safety precautions.

COSM 1050: Hair Color

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Introduces the theory and application of temporary, semipermanent, demipermanent-deposit only, and permanent hair coloring, hair lightening, and color removal products and application. Topics include: principles of color theory, hair structure, color, tone, classifications of color, hair lightening, color removal, application procedures, safety precautions, client consultation, product knowledge, hair color challenges, corrective solutions, and special effects.

COSM 1060: Fundamentals of Skin Care

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
This course provides a comprehensive study in care of the skin for theory and practical application. Emphasis will be placed on client consultation, safety precautions, skin conditions, product knowledge, basic facials, facial massage, corrective facial treatments, hair removal, and make-up application. Other topics in this course include advanced skin treatments in electrotherapy, light therapy, galvanic current, high frequency, and microdermabrasion.

COSM 1070: Nail Care and Advanced Techniques

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1000
Provides training in manicuring, pedicuring and advanced nail techniques. Topics include: implements, products and supplies, hand and foot anatomy and Physiology, diseases and disorders, manicure techniques, pedicure techniques, nail product chemistry, safety precautions and practices, and advanced nail techniques (wraps/tips/acrylics).

COSM 1080: Physical Hair Services Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : COSM 1000, COSM 1020, COSM 1030, COSM 1040
Corequisite : None
Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is required by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the required hours for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; various hair color techniques, foiling and lightening; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; styling; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; dispensary; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance.

COSM 1090: Hair Services Practicum I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : COSM 1000, COSM 1010, COSM 1020, COSM 1030, COSM 1040, COSM 1050
Corequisite : None
Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is prescribed by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the hours required for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color, foiling, lightening, skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; clipper design, precision cutting, styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; product knowledge, customer service skills, client retention, State Board Rules and Regulations guidelines, and State Board foundation prep.

COSM 1100: Hair Services Practicum II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1090
Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The appropriate number of applications for completion of state board service credit requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: texture services; permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and lightening; skin, scalp, and hair treatment; haircutting; styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance.

COSM 1110: Hair Services Practicum III

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1100
Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; dispensary; styling; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; and state licensure preparation.

COSM 1115: Hair Services Practicum IV

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1110
This course provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and lightening; hair and scalp treatments; haircutting; dispensary; styling; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; and state licensure preparation.

COSM 1120: Salon Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the steps involved in opening and operating a privately owned salon. Topics include: law requirements regarding employment, tax payer education / federal and state responsibilities, law requirements for owning and operating a salon business, business management practices, and public relations and career development.

COSM 1125: Skin and Nail Care Practicum

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : COSM 1060, COSM 1070
This course provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The appropriate number of applications for completion of state board service credit requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: skin treatment; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance.

COSM 1180: Nail Care I

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite : COSM 1000, COSM 1070
Corequisite : None
Provides additional experience in Manicuring and Pedicuring techniques required of applicants for state licensure. Emphasis is placed on performance, using live models in an actual or simulated occupational setting. Topics include: manicure, nail repair, artificial nails, pedicure, nail art, reception, dispensary, advanced/new techniques, documentation, customer service skills, safety precautions, federal/state agency compliance, and state board foundation prep.

COSM 1190: Nail Care II

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite : COSM 1180
Corequisite : None
Provides nail care experience on live models. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The appropriate number of applications required by the state board of cosmetology in theory and service credit requirements for this course. Emphasis is placed on performance, using live models in an actual or simulated occupational setting. Topics include: manicure, nail repair, artificial nails, pedicure, nail art, electric drill, reception, dispensary, advanced/new techniques, documentation, customer service skills, safety precautions, federal/state agency compliance, and state board comprehension.

CRJU 1010: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.

CRJU 1030: Corrections

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides an analysis of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives. Topics include: history and evolution of correctional facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilities and procedures; probation, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community involvement; and staffing.

CRJU 1040: Principles of Law Enforcement

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Topics include: history and philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs.

CRJU 1043: Probation and Parole

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course will cover the history of both juvenile and adult probation as well as the history of parole. The probation and parole systems will be covered generally with a special emphasis on the Georgia systems and related laws. Topics include: history and philosophy of probation and parole; function of the probation and parole systems; Georgia law related to probation and parole; characteristics and roles of probation and parole officers; and special issues and programs of probation and parole.

CRJU 1050: Police Patrol Operations

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course presents the knowledge and skills associated with police patrol operations. Emphasis is placed on patrol techniques, crimes in progress, crisis intervention, domestic disputes, Georgia Crime Information Center procedures, electronics communications and police reports. Topics include: foundations, policing skills and communication skills

CRJU 1054: Police Officer Survival

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course examines the critical issues involved in the survival of a police officer in all aspects including their physical, mental, and psychological wellbeing. Emphasis is placed on personal protection skills, defensive tactics, handcuffing techniques, patrol tactics, vehicle stops, building searches and use of force.

CRJU 1062: Methods of Criminal Investigation

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course presents the fundamentals of criminal investigation. The duties and responsibilities of the investigator both in field and in the courtroom are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on techniques commonly utilized by investigative personnel as well as the procedures used for investigating various crimes.

CRJU 1063: Crime Scene Processing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course presents students with practical exercises dealing with investigating crime scenes and gathering various forms of physical evidence. Emphasis is placed on crime scene assessment, search, fingerprinting, and evidence collection. Topics include: crime scene management, evidence characteristics, identification, documentation and collection as well as techniques for developing and lifting latent

CRJU 1065: Community-Oriented Policing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Presents the fundamentals for the community-oriented policing philosophy, including the comparison of traditional and community policing philosophies; law enforcement and community relationships; importance of political and public support and involvement; attitudinal changes involving the roles of police management, supervisors and line personnel; creation of partnerships with community organizations, businesses, private security, other governmental agencies, and special interest groups; and police problem-solving methodologies. Topics include: foundations of community-oriented policing, partnerships and problem-solving in community-oriented policing, and community-oriented policing projects and programs.

CRJU 1068: Criminal Law for Criminal Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course introduces criminal law in the United States, but emphasizes the current specific status of Georgia criminal law. The course will focus on the most current statutory contents of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) with primary emphasis on the criminal and traffic codes. Topics include: historic development of criminal law in the United States; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 16 - Crimes and Offenses; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 40 - Motor Vehicle and Traffic Offenses; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to criminal law.

CRJU 1072: Introduction to Forensic Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
The origin, history and role of forensic science in the investigative process. Philosophical, rational and practical framework that supports a case investigation will be outlined. The unifying principles of forensic science, the rooting of forensic science in the pure sciences, and the unique ways in which a forensic scientist must think will also be discussed. The special areas of forensic science will be explored.

CRJU 1074: Applications in Introductory Forensics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course complements CRJU 1072: Introduction to Forensics, focusing particularly on the practical application of forensic science in law
enforcement including the following: crime scene investigation; interview and interrogation techniques; as well as case preparation and courtroom testimony.

CRJU 1400: Ethics and Cultural Perspectives for Criminal Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides an exploration ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan.

CRJU 2020: Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government; principles governing the operation of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment.

CRJU 2050: Criminal Procedure

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Introduces the substantive law of major crimes against persons and property. Attention is given to observation of courtroom trials. Topics include: laws of arrest and search and seizure; procedures governing arrest, trial, and administration of criminal sanctions; rules of evidence; general court procedures; rights and duties of officers and citizens; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to Law Enforcement/Overview of Constitutional Law.

CRJU 2060: Criminology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Introduces the nature, extent, and factors related to criminal behavior, and the etiology of criminal offenses and offenders. Topics include: sociological, psychological, and biological causes of crime; effectiveness of theories in explaining crime; theory integration; and application of theory to selected issues.

CRJU 2070: Juvenile Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Analyzes the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in the field of juvenile justice. Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency.

CRJU 2090: Criminal Justice Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue a professional research project supervised by the instructor. Topics include: criminal justice theory applications.

CRJU 2100: Criminal Justice Internship/Externship

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue an externship in a related agency supervised by the instructor. Topics include: criminal justice theory applications.

CRJU 2110: Homeland Security

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
The course provides an introduction to the principles of homeland security, roles and responsibilities of constituencies and implications for criminal justice fields. Topics include: intelligence and warning, border and transportation security, domestic counterterrorism, protecting critical infrastructure, defending against catastrophic threats, and emergency preparedness and response.

CRJU 2150: Cybercrime Investigations

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CRJU 1010, CRJU 2050
This course is designed to address the fundamental principles of different types of cybercrime investigations, and the specific procedures used to investigate them. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of specific offenses, the identification of sources of information, and the procedures used to properly collect and store digital evidence. The course is designed to develop a working knowledge of the investigative steps to be followed in a cybercrime investigation, beginning with initial crime scene security and concluding with proper testimony and presentation of evidence in court. This course includes study designed to reinforce important investigative and forensic evidence collection skills.

CRJU 2201: Criminal Courts

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course examines the historical context on the development, functions, and controversies in the courts system. Topics include: introduction to the courts; participants of a trial; courtroom processes; and the post conviction process.

CRJU 2500: Written Communication in Criminal Justice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CRJU 1010
Corequisite : None
Explains and demonstrates the effectiveness of the entire criminal investigation process through various reports in the criminal justice system.
An examination of what goes into the preparation, content, elements, mechanics, and format of documenting administrative, court,
investigative, and procedural processes. Topics include: Communication processes, field notes, initial information, basic reports, affidavits and
other forensic reports, questioning, interviewing, interacting with victims of crime, evidence, and hostage negotiations, laboratory analysis and
results, investigative follow-up, suspect statements, and the characteristics essential to quality report writing.

CTDL 1010: Fundamentals of Commercial Driving

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Fundamentals of Commercial Driving introduces students to the transportation industry, federal and state regulations, records and forms, industrial relations, and other non-driving activities. This course provides an emphasis on safety that will continue throughout the program.

CTDL 1020: Combination Vehicle Basic Operation and Range Work

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : CTDL 1010
This course familiarizes students with truck instruments and controls and performing basic maneuvers required to drive safely in a controlled environment and on the Driving Range. Each student must receive 12 hours behind the wheel (BTW) instructional time in range operations such as operating a tractor trailer through clearance maneuvers, backing, turning, parallel parking and coupling/uncoupling.

CTDL 1030: Combination Vehicle Advanced Operations

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : CTDL 1020
Advanced Operations develops students' driving skills under actual road conditions. The classroom part of the course stresses following safe operating practices. These safe operating practices are integrated into the development of driving skills on the road. Each student must receive at least twelve (12) hours behind-the-wheel (BTW) instructional time on the street/road. In addition the student must have a minimum program total of forty four (44) hours BTW instructional time in any combination (with CTDL 1020) of range and street/road driving. Note: state law requires that whenever a combination vehicle is operated on public roads an instructor must be present in the vehicle while the student is driving.

CUUL 1000: Fundamentals of Culinary Arts

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : MATH 1012
Provides an overview of the professionalism in culinary arts, culinary career opportunities, Chef history, pride, and esprit de corps. Introduces principles and practices necessary to food, supply, and equipment selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Topics include: cuisine, food service organizations, career opportunities, food service styles, basic culinary management techniques, professionalism, culinary work ethics, quality factors, food tests, pricing procedures, cost determination and control, selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Laboratory demonstration and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUUL 1001: Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduction to Culinary Arts is a course designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods in Culinary Arts where laboratory practice will parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures.

CUUL 1002: Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts I

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts I is designed to create a complete foundation and understanding of Culinary Arts leading to postsecondary
education or a foodservice career. Building from techniques and skills learned in Foundation of Culinary Arts, this fundamentals course begins to involve in-depth knowledge and hands on skill mastery of Culinary Arts.

CUUL 1003: Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts II

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts II is designed to create a complete foundation and understanding of Culinary Arts and how it relates to baking principles, nutrition, and applies the concepts to a restaurant setting. Building from techniques and skills learned in Foundation of Culinary Arts I, this fundamentals course begins to involve in-depth knowledge and hands on skill mastery of Culinary Arts.

CUUL 1004: Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts III

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Fundamental Skills of Culinary Arts III is an advanced and rigorous in-depth course designed for the student who wishes to continue their education at the post-secondary level or enter the foodservice industry as a proficient and well-rounded individual. Strong importance is given to refining hands on production of the classic fundamentals in the commercial kitchen.

CUUL 1110: Culinary Safety and Sanitation

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes fundamental kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, maintenance, and operation procedures. Topics include: cleaning standards, O.S.H.A. M.S.D.S. guidelines, sanitary procedures following SERV-SAFE guidelines, HACCAP, safety practices, basic kitchen first aid, operation of equipment, cleaning and maintenance of equipment, dishwashing, and pot and pan cleaning. Laboratory practice parallels class work.

CUUL 1120: Principles of Cooking

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : CUUL 1110
This course introduces fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute apprenticeship training objectives. Topics include: weights and measures, conversions, basic cooking principles, methods of food preparation, recipe utilization, and nutrition. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUUL 1129: Fundamentals of Restaurant Operations

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : CUUL 1120
Corequisite : None
Introduces the fundamentals of dining and beverage service and experience in preparation of a wide variety of quantity foods. Course content reflect American Culinary Federation Education Institute apprenticeship training objectives. Topics include: dining service/guest service, dining service positions and functions, international dining services, restaurant business laws, preparation and setup, table side service, and beverage service and setup, kitchen operational procedures, equipment use, banquet planning, recipe conversion, food decorating, safety and sanitation, and production of quantity food. Laboratory practice parallels class work.

CUUL 1220: Baking Principles

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite : CUUL 1120
Corequisite : None
Baking Principles presents the fundamental terms, concepts, and methods involved in preparation of yeast and quick breads and baked products. Emphasis is placed on conformance of sanitation and hygienic work habits with health laws. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute cook and pastry apprenticeship training objectives, along with Retail Bakery Association training program. Topics include: baking principles; Science and use of baking ingredients for breads, desserts, cakes, pastries; weights, measures, and conversions; preparation of baked goods, baking sanitation and hygiene, baking supplies and equipment. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUUL 1320: Garde Manger

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : CUUL 1120
Corequisite : None
Introduces basic pantry manger principles, utilization, preparation, and integration into other kitchen operations. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute apprenticeship pantry, garnishing, and presentation training objectives. Topics include: pantry functions; garnishes, carving, and decorating; buffet presentation; cold preparations; hot/cold sandwiches; salads, dressings and relishes; breakfast preparation; hot/cold hors d'oeuvres; chaudfroids, gelees, and molds; and pats and terrines. Laboratory practice parallels class work.

CUUL 1370: Culinary Nutrition & Menu Development

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CUUL 1120
Corequisite : None
This course emphasizes menu planning for all types of facilities, services, and special diets. Topics include: menu selection, menu development and pricing, nutrition, special diets, cooking nutritional foods, and organics. Laboratory demonstrations and student management and supervision parallel class work.

CUUL 2130: Culinary Practicum

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite : CUUL 1220, CUUL 1320
Corequisite : None
This course familiarizes students with the principles and methods of sound decision making in the hospitality industry and provides them with the opportunity to gain management/supervisory experience in an actual job setting. Students will be placed in an appropriate restaurant, catering, or other food service business for four days per week throughout the semester. On-the-job training topics include restaurant management/on-off premise, catering/food service business, supervisory training, and management training, on-off premise catering, hotel kitchen organization, kitchen management, restaurant kitchen systems, institutional food systems, kitchen departmental responsibilities, and kitchen productivity.

CUUL 2140: Advanced Baking and International Cuisine

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite : CUUL 1220, CUUL 1320
Corequisite : None
This course introduces international cuisine and acquisition of advanced cookery techniques. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute cook apprenticeship training objectives and provides background for those aspiring to become chefs. Topics include: international cuisine, advanced grill cookery, advanced vegetable cookery, advanced meat cookery, advanced line cookery, advanced fry cookery and nutrition. Laboratory practice parallels class work. ***Provides in-depth experience in preparing many types of baked goods commonly found in restaurants and hotels. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation and Retail Bakery Association training objectives and provides background for those aspiring to become pastry chefs or bakery supervisors. Topics include: breads, pies, cakes, pastry dough, puff pastry, icing, filling, and candy. Laboratory practice parallels class work.

CUUL 2160: Contemporary Cuisine

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : CUUL 1220, CUUL 1320
Corequisite : None
This course emphasizes all modern cuisine and introduces management concepts necessary to the functioning of a commercial kitchen. Topics include: international cuisine, cuisine trends, kitchen organization, kitchen management, kitchen supervision, competition entry, nutrition, menu selection, layout and design, and on/off premise catering. Laboratory demonstration and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUUL 2190: Principles of Culinary Leadership

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Familiarizes the student with principles, skills, methods, and behaviors necessary for sound leadership of people in their job responsibilities.  Emphasis will be placed on real-life concepts, personal skill development, applied knowledge, and managing human resources. Course content is intended to help leaders, managers, and supervisors deal with a dramatically changing workplace that is affected by technology changes, a more competitive and global market place, corporate restructuring, and the changing nature of work and the workforce. Topics include: Leadership Principles, Leadership Relative to the Function of Management; Decision Making Process; Building and Effect Organizational Culture; Human Resource Management; and Delegating Management, Organization, and Control.

ECCE 1101: Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces concepts relating the responsibilities and procedures involved in a variety of early childhood care situations. Topics include historical perspectives; professionalism; guidance; developmentally appropriate practices; learning environment (including all children); cultural diversity; and licensing, accreditation, and credentialing.

ECCE 1103: Child Growth and Development

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of the young child (prenatal through 12 years of age). The course provides for competency development in observing, recording, and interpreting growth and development stages in the young child; advancing physical and intellectual competence; supporting social and emotional development; and examining relationships between child development and positive guidance. Topics include developmental characteristics, prenatal through age 12, developmental guidance applications, observing and recording techniques, ages and stages of development, and introduction to children with special needs.

ECCE 1105: Health, Safety and Nutrition

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the theory, practices, and requirements for establishing and maintaining a safe, healthy learning environment. Topics include CPR and first aid, health issues, safety issues, child abuse and neglect, and nutritional needs of children.

ECCE 1112: Curriculum and Assessment

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Provides student with an understanding of developmentally effective approaches to teaching, learning, observing, documenting and assessment strategies that promote positive development for young children. The course will enable the student to establish a learning environment appropriate for young children and to identify the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment in the development of curriculum for young children. Topics include observing, documenting, and assessing; learning environments; development of curriculum plans and materials; curriculum approaches; and instructional media.

ECCE 1113: Creative Activities for Child

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the concepts related to creativity in art,music, movement and creative drama, and facilitating children's creative expression across the curriculum. Topics include concepts of creativity and expression; theories of young children's creative development; facilitation of children's creative expression, media, methods and materials across the curriculum; appreciation of children's art processes and products; appreciation of children's creativity in music, movement and dance; appreciation of children's creative expression in play and creative drama; and art and music appreciation.

ECCE 1121: Early Childhood Care and Education Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1105
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in a practicum placement site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Practicum topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; becoming a professional; and guidance techniques and classroom management.

ECCE 2115: Language and Literacy

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Develops knowledge, skills, and abilities in supporting young children's literacy acquisition and development, birth through age twelve. Topics include developmental continuum of reading and writing, literacy acquisition birth to five years of age, literacy acquisition in kindergarten, literacy acquisition in early grades, and literacy acquisition in children who are culturally and linguistically diverse.

ECCE 2116: Math and Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Presents the process of introducing math and science concepts to young children. Includes planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate activities and development of math and science materials, media and methods. Topics include inquiry approach to learning; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children birth to five; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children in kindergarten and primary grades; planning math and science activities; and development of math and science materials, media and methods.

ECCE 2201: Exceptionalities

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ECCE 1103
Corequisite : None
Provides for the development of knowledge and skills that will enable the student to understand individuals with special needs and appropriately guide their development. Special emphasis is placed on acquainting the student with programs and community resources that serve families with children with special needs. Topics include inclusion/least restrictive environment (LRE), physical and motor impairments, gifted/talented, intellectual and cognitive disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, communication disorders in speech and language, autism spectrum disorders, visual impairments, deaf and hard of hearing, health impairments, multiple disabilities, and community resources.

ECCE 2202: Social Issues and Family Involvement

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Enables the student to value the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and to develop culturally responsive practices which will support family partnerships. Students use their understanding to build reciprocal relationships which promote children's development and learning. Students are introduced to local programs and agencies that offer services to children and families within the community. Topics include professional responsibilities, family/social issues, community resources, family education and support, teacher-family communication, community partnerships, social diversity and anti-bias concerns, successful transitions, and school-family activities.

ECCE 2203: Guidance and Classroom Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Examines effective guidance practices in group settings based upon the application of theoretical models of child development and of developmentally appropriate practices. Focus will be given to individual, family, and cultural diversity. Topics will include developmentally appropriate child guidance (birth through 12); effective classroom management, including preventive and interventive techniques; understanding challenging behaviors; and implementing guidance plans.

ECCE 2245: Early Childhood Care and Education Internship I

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite : ECCE 1101, ECCE 1103
Corequisite : ECCE 1105
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in an actual or simulated work site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Internship topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relations; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; using developmentally effective approaches; using content knowledge to build meaningful curriculum; and becoming a professional.

ECCE 2246: Early Childhood Care and Education Internship II

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisite : ECCE 1101, ECCE 1103
Corequisite : ECCE 1105
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in an actual or simulated work site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Internship topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relations; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; using developmentally effective approaches; using content knowledge to build meaningful curriculum; and becoming a professional.

ECCE 2310: Paraprofessional Methods and Materials

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Develops the instructional skills to enable the student to work as a paraprofessional in a program for kindergarten through elementary age children. Topics include assessment and curriculum, instructional techniques, and methods for instruction in a learning environment.

ECCE 2312: Paraprofessional Role and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : ECCE 1103
Develops skills to enable the student to work as a paraprofessional in a program for kindergarten through elementary aged children. Topics include professional qualifications, professional and ethical conduct, professionalism and employment, and paraprofessional roles and responsibilities.

ECCE 2320: Program Administration and Facility Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Provides training in planning, implementation, and maintenance of an effective early childhood program and facility. Topics include organization, mission, philosophy, goals of a program; types of programs; laws, rules, regulations, accreditation, and program evaluation; needs assessment; administrative roles and board of directors; anti-bias program development; child development and developmentally appropriate practices; marketing, public and community relations, grouping, enrollment and retention; working with families; professionalism and work ethics; space management; money management; and program, equipment, and supplies management.

ECCE 2322: Personnel Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Provides training in early childhood personnel management. Topics include staff records; communication; personnel policies; managing payroll; recruitment, interviewing, selection, hiring, motivating, and firing; staff retention; staff scheduling; staff development; staff supervision; conflict resolution; staff evaluations; ethical responsibilities to employees; and time and stress management.

ECCE 2360: Class Strategies for Exceptional Children

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ECCE 2201
Corequisite : None
Prepares child care providers and paraprofessionals with knowledge and skills in the areas of working effectively with children with a disability; working with families as partners; examining the laws and regulations; exploring resources, service providers, and agencies that may assist the child and his/her family; examining the adaptations and modifications to facilities and environments; reviewing the referral process; implementing inclusion; modifying instruction to accommodate the child with special needs; and investigating ways to document and chart observations.

ECCE 2362: Exploring Your Role in Exceptional Environment

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ECCE 2201
Corequisite : None
Prepares child care providers and paraprofessionals with knowledge and skills for screening and assessing purposes; and explores resources, service providers, and agencies that may assist the child and families in educational or natural settings. Examines adaptations, accommodations, and modifications to environments; reviews the referral process; implements inclusion and modifies instruction to accommodate the child with special needs.

ECON 1101: Principles of Economics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective

ECON 2105: Macroeconomics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic principles and policies. Topics include basic economic principles, macroeconomic concepts, equilibrium in the goods and money markets, macroeconomic equilibrium and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies.

EMPL 1000: Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes human relations and professional development in today's rapidly changing world that prepares students for living and working in a complex society. Topics include human relations skills, job acquisition skills and communication, job retention skills, job advancement skills, and professional image skills.

ENGL 1010: Fundamentals of English I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Diploma Level Reading and Writing Scores OR READ 0097 and/or ENGL 0097 w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills.

ENGL 1101: Composition and Rhetoric

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : (ENGL 0098 or Test Score) AND (READ 0098 or Test Score)
Corequisite : None
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

ENGL 1102: Literature and Composition

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ENGL 1101 w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : None

Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

ENGL 2130: American Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ENGL 1101 w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.

FOSC 1206: Introduction to Forensic Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This introductory course will provide a broad overview of the areas in forensic science covered in higher level courses. Topics include the recognition, identification, individualization and evaluation of various types of physical evidence, forensic science and the law, and ethics in forensic science. The relationship of forensic science to the natural sciences and the use of the scientific method in forensic science will also be explored.

FOSC 2033: Death Investigation

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : CRJU 1072
Corequisite : None
This course examines the fundamentals of a medicolegal death investigation, the operation of death investigation system and the role of the death investigator. Procedures required to assist the medical examiner/ coroner in determining the deceased persons cause and manner of death are discussed. Additional topics include autopsy technique, sudden and unexpected death, natural death, specific wound and injury characteristics, and child death.

FOSC 2037: Victimology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
While individuals have been crime victims for many years, victimology or the study of crime victims is a relatively recent discipline. The majority of criminological research and discussion has been focused on the offender rather than the victim. This course provides an overview of the principles and concepts of victimology, an analysis of victimization patterns and trends, and the role of victimology in the justice system. In addition the repercussions of victimization, victim reporting patterns and remedies available for victims are also explored.

FOSC 2041: Latent Print Examination

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission, CRJU 1072
Corequisite : None
This course explains the history, biology, and basic principles of friction ridge analysis. Properly recording, processing, documenting, collecting, and preserving latent print evidence will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and the analysis, comparison, and evaluation of latent prints. Various lab exercises will also be conducted to demonstrate processing methods used in latent print examination.

FRSC 1020: Basic Firefighter-Emergency Services Fundamentals

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None

This course provides the student with information on the applicable laws, policies, and standards that the Firefighter I course is designed, and how the course will be administered. This course provides the emergency responder with basic principles and functions of the Incident Command System. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to operate within the ICS and their role within the ICS at the fire station, at a non-emergency scene, and at emergency scenes. It will provide also provide the emergency responder with knowledge on how to perform basic skills at emergency scenes that deal with infection control, cardiopulmonary resscitation, basic first aid measures, and using an AED. Finally, it will provide the emergency responder skills and knowledge on how to recognize the presence of and the
potential for a hazardous materials release, and how and who personnel should call. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Infection Control 2. CPR
3. First Aid 4. ICS-100 5. IS-700 6. State of Georgia - Hazardous Materials for First Responders Awareness Level This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state,
local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
This course provides the emergency responder with basic principles and functions of the Incident Command System.  The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to operate within the ICS and their role within the ICS at the fire station, at a non-emergency scene, and at emergency scenes. It will provide also provide the emergency responder with knowledge on how to perform basic skills at emergency scenes that deal with infection control, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic first aid measures, and using an AED. Finally, it will provide the emergency responder skills and knowledge on how to recognize the presence of and the potential for a hazardous materials release, and how and who personnel should call.

Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following:
1. Infection Control
2. CPR
3. First Aid
4. ICS-100
5. IS-700
6. NPQ - Hazardous Materials for First Responders Awareness Leve

FRSC 1030: Basic Firefighter - MODULE I

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course will provide the student basic knowledge of where and how the fire service originated from the colonial periods to present day firefighting operations. The student will learn basic roles and responsibilities of a firefighter, how firefighters have to abide by and work from standard operating procedures and guidelines, and how the chain of command works and their position within it. The student will be provided the knowledge on how to communicate within the fire service; whether it with the fire station or on the fire ground.This course provides the firefighter candidate/recruit
with basic knowledge and skills to perform various fire ground operations as a firefighter on emergency scenes. The candidate/recruit will learn about safety during all phases of a firefighters career, the personal protective equipment that is required for training and every emergency response, and how to properly don it for use and doff it after use. The candidate/recruit will learn about the dynamics of fire through fire behavior and how to extinguish the different phases of fires with either portable fire extinguishers or through fire suppression attacks and techniques. The candidate/recruit will
also learn the three tactical priorities of Life Safety, Incident Stabilization, and Property Conservation that have to be achieved on every fireground. Basic knowledge and skills will be provided to the candidate/recruit so they can achieve the tactical priorities through various fireground operations such as: response & size-up, forcible entry, ladders, search & rescue, ventilation, water supply, fire hose, fire nozzles, fire streams, salvage, and overhaul. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Module I This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.

FRSC 1040: Basic Firefighter - MODULE II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None

This course builds from the skills and knowledge in Module I and provides the knowledge and skills to support the fireground techniques learned in the previous courses. The firefighter will learn various uses of ropes & knots and how to hoist fire fighting tools and equipment. The firefighter will also gain the knowledge and skills of building construction principles that will be used throughout their firefighting career to identify building conditions such as: fire spread and travel, how and where to ventilate, indications of potential building collapse, etc. The firefighter will learn survival techniques that will be used throughout their career to help keep themselves safe and how to rescue themselves or another firefighter. Firefighter rehabilitation will be discussed during this course, so that the firefighter will know how and
when to properly rehab themselves before, during, after an emergency response. Knowledge of fire suppression systems will be discussed, so that the firefighter will have a basic understanding of the components of a fire detection, protection, and suppression system. Basic cause determination will be discussed so that firefighters will be aware of observations during various phases of fireground operations.

Finally to complete the Firefighter I program the firefighter will participate in the following live fire scenarios in order to complete the objectives of the program.
1.Exterior Class A Fire
2.Interior Structure Attack Above Grade Level
3.Interior Structure Attack Below Grade Level
4.Vehicle Fire
5.Dumpster Fire

Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following:
1.State of Georgia certified firefighter
This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.

FRSC 1050: Fire and Life Safety Educator I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040, FRSC 1141
Corequisite : None
Most structural fires, fire deaths and fire injuries occur in the home. This course addresses some of the most important responsibilities of the modern fire service; teaching the public to prevent or if needed, escape fires and related emergencies. We have adopted the approach that we must learn from each incident then put the information to work to prevent fires and fire losses through public fire and life safety education. Topics include: general requisite knowledge, administration, planning and development, education and implementation, and evaluation.

FRSC 1060: Fire Prevention, Preparedness and Maintenance

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides the student with the necessary skills of fire prevention, emergency scene preparedness, and tool and equipment maintenance. Specifically addressed are the following topics: basic principles of building construction; knowledge of water supply systems to include pressurized systems, rural water supplies, and alternative water supplies; perform hydrant flow tests as part of water flow assessments for water supplies coming from pressurized hydrants; discuss fire detection, suppression, and suppression systems; consolidate all knowledge to perform a pre-incident plan of a facility; selection of proper tools and techniques of cleaning and proper maintenance of those tools; discuss hoselines, nozzles, and fire streams to perform hoseline lays with proper nozzles attached and select the proper fire stream for the class of fire encountered on various types of fire scenes; and service testing of fire hoses. Finally, this course will conclude fire cause determination to gain necessary knowledge and skills to perform a fire investigation to determine the point of origin and the cause of a fire in a structure.
To participate in this course the student must also attain national  certification of Firefighter I status or state firefighter
certification status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC 1141.

FRSC 1070: Introduction to Technical Rescue

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides an awareness of the principles of technical rescue through utilization of readings from the text, classroom discussion, practical skills, and practice. This course includes Extricating a victim entrapped in a Motor Vehicle, Assisting a Rescue Team in various technical rescue operations including but not limited to Trench and Excavation, Rope Rescue, Water Rescue, Confined Space Operations, Structural Collapse, Vehicle and Machinery Rescue, and Wilderness Search and Rescue. The student will learn the application of knots, rigging principles, anchor selection criteria, system safety check procedures, rope construction and rope rescue equipment applications and limitations. This course fulfills NFPA 1001, Standard for Firefighter Professional Qualifications, current Edition Chapter 6 for firefighter II rescue operations and NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications, 2008 Edition Chapter 5 sections 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5.1, 5.5.2, 5.5.3, 5.5.4, 5.5.5, 5.5.8, 5.5.9, 5.5.11, 5.5.14 and NFPA 1670, Standard on operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents, current Edition sections 5.2.2, 6.2.2, 6.3.47.2.48.2.3, 9.2.3, 10.2.2, 11.2.
To participate in this course, the student must also have attained state firefighter certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC 1141.

FRSC 1080: Fireground Operations

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course will provide the student basic knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the Firefighter II; the standard operating procedures and guidelines of firefighters; fire service communications relative to obtaining information from occupants and owners to complete an incident report can be completed accurately; Incident Command principles and their application; practical fireground hydraulics to supply proper nozzle pressures while participating in live fire scenarios.
To participate in this course the student must also attain state firefighter certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040, FRSC 1141.

FRSC 1100: Introduction to the Fire Service

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course is a survey of the philosophy and history of Fire Protection, loss of property and life by fire, review of municipal fire defenses and the organization and function of the federal, state, county, city and private fire protection. Includes introduction to: fire technology education and the firefighter selection process; fire protection career opportunities; public fire protection; chemistry and physics of fire; public and private support organizations; fire department resources, fire department administration; support functions; training, fire prevention; codes and ordinances; fire protection systems and equipment; emergency incident management; and emergency operations.

FRSC 1110: Fire Administration - Supervision and Leadership

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides the necessary knowledge and skills for an emergency responder to become a successful fire officer. The student will learn how to become a responsible leader and supervisor to a crew of firefighters, how to manage a budget for the fire station, understand standard operating procedures, and be able to manage an incident. Also, an understanding of basic fire prevention methods, fire and building codes, and records systems will be covered throughout the course. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to qualify for a certificate of completion or seek certification through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. NFA Leadership I 2. NFA Leadership II 3. NFA Leadership III This course meets the requirements NFPA 1021 Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.

FRSC 1121: Firefighting Strategy and Tactics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course presents the principles of applying fire department resources to mitigate a fire or related emergency. General topics include: principles of firefighting, size up, engine company operations, hose line selection and placement, water supply, standpipe and sprinkler operations, ladder company operations, forcible entry, ventilation and search and rescue. Specific-fires reviewed will include private dwellings, multiple dwellings, commercial buildings, high-rise structures, buildings under construction, structural collapse, flammable liquid and gas fires and waterfront fires.

FRSC 1132: Fire Service Instructor

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Students will learn to analyze jobs and information, then prepare and present related training. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, presenting, and testing, using methodologies appropriate to the subject. Topics include: orientation to emergency services instruction, communication, planning and analysis, objectives, learning, assessment, methods of instruction, instructor materials, media, training related group dynamics, classroom management, the legal environment, and NPQ Fire Instructor I. Students will have numerous hands-on opportunities to apply what they learn. Successful completers of FRSC 1132 are qualified to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Fire Instructor I Exam.

FRSC 1141: Hazardous Materials Operations

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course provides emergency responder personnel with the information to respond safely, limit possible exposure to all personnel, and to provide information to the proper authorities as being a primary goal while reacting in the defensive mode of operation. The first responder operations level responsibilities are recognition and identification of a hazardous material scene, the gathering of information, the notification of the proper authorities, the isolation of the area by setting perimeters/zones, possible evacuation, protection by initiating the incident management system, emergency decontamination, and performing defensive actions only. Even though the first responder is a member of an emergency response service, they are not trained in specialized protective clothing or specialized control equipment. Thus, the first responder is not a member of a hazardous materials response team. This course meets the requirements of NFPA 472 - Professional Competence of First Responders to Hazardous Material Incidents at the Operations Level. This course also meets the requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120, EPA, USDOT, and all other appropriate state, local and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
Also required as prerequisite: state certification NPQ FF I and NPQ Hazardous Materials Awareness Level

FRSC 1151: Fire Prevention & Inspection

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Emphasis is placed on the shared responsibility of all fire service personnel to prevent fires and fire losses by survey of fire prevention activities, conducting basic fire prevention inspections, practicing life safety codes, review of local and state laws regarding fire inspection, and review of applicable codes and standards. Topics include: code administration, inspection, use and occupancy, building limitations and types of construction, fire resistive construction elements, installation of fire protection systems, mean of egress, interior finish requirements, general fire safety provisions, maintenance of fire protection systems, means of egress maintenance for occupancies, hazardous materials, flammable liquids and aerosols, detonation and deflagration hazards, hazardous assembly occupancies, other storage and processing occupancies, compressed gases and cryogenic liquids, pesticides and other health hazards, and using referenced standards. Successful completion of FRSC 1151 qualifies individuals to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Inspector Level-I examination

FRSC 1161: Fire Service Safety and Loss Control

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to understand occupational safety and health and be able to develop safety programs. The course starts with an introduction to occupational safety and health and covers the history, national agencies that produce injury and fatality reports, and efforts that have been made to address safety and health problems in emergency service occupations. The course will review safety related regulations and standards and discuss how to implement them through risk management processes. There will be lectures and discussions on pre-incident safety, safety at fire emergencies, safety at medical and rescue emergencies, safety at specialized incidents, and post-incident safety management. Personnel roles and responsibilities will be covered, so that knowledge can be gained on the relationship to the overall safety and health program by the different responding and administrative personnel at emergency scenes. Lectures and discussions on how to develop, manage, and evaluate safety programs will be covered to provide general knowledge and basic skills on occupational health and safety programs. Finally information management and various other special topics will be covered to gain knowledge on the legal, ethical, and financial considerations that programs need to be aware of and how to collect the data and report it.

FRSC 2100: Fire Administration Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to become a diverse leader and manager in their department. The course starts with the history of the fire service which focuses on the historical events that have forged the fire service today. Discussions on preparing for the future are designed to provide information to develop a game plan for personal success. Leadership and Management principles will be taught to blend the academics of leadership and management research into what occurs in the fire service organization on a daily basis. Leadership styles will be discussed to help understand how to lead and manage and, as important, why it's done. The course will take an insightful look into how people handle change personally and organizationally. Discussions on ethics will be focused on the elements critical to ethical leadership and management practices. The course will explore the elements of team building and provide a depth of understanding how to blend various styles and personalities to get the most from people. Discussions on managing emergency services will target budgeting and personnel management the support elements that are so vital to every organization. Quality of the fire service will also be looked at for methods of quality improvement and their applications to improve the services delivered to citizens every day. An in-depth overview of the changes in disaster planning and response since 9-11, and includes ways to help with community evaluation and preparedness processes. Finally, shaping the future will explore the possibilities of what may occur in the fire service and how you can play an important role in helping to shape the fire service of the future.

FRSC 2110: Fire Service Hydraulics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
This course begins with the history and theories of the use of water for fire extinguishment then moves to practical application of the principles of hydraulics in water systems and on the fire ground. Topics include: water at rest and in motion, velocity and discharge, water distribution systems, fire service pumps, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressures, fire streams, standpipe systems, automatic sprinkler systems, firefighting foams, and the clip board friction loss system.

FRSC 2120: Fire Protection Systems

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
A review of fire detection and protection systems including: automatic sprinkler systems, portable fire extinguishers, restaurant/kitchen systems, special hazard systems, detection systems, and control systems. The applicable laws, codes and standards will be introduced along with regulatory and support agencies. Specific topics include: introduction to fire protection systems, water supply systems for fire protection systems, water-based suppression systems, non water-based suppression systems, fire alarm systems, smoke management systems, and portable fire extinguishers.

FRSC 2130: Fire Service Building Construction

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Presents building construction features from the perspective of the fire service with emphasis placed on the use of building construction information to prevent and reduce fire fighter and civilian deaths and injuries. Topics include: principles of building construction, building construction classification, building construction hazards and tactical considerations, structural loads and stresses, structural building components and functions, fire resistance and flame spread, building codes, structural failure and firefighter safety, and firefighter safety in structural and wildland firefighting.

FRSC 2141: Incident Command

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
The Incident Command course is designed to illustrate the responsibilities to use, deploy, implement, and/or function within an Incident Command System (ICS) as well as functioning within multi-jurisdictions incident under the Incident Management System (IMS). The course emphasizes the need for incident management systems, an overview of the structure and expandable nature of ICS, an understanding of the command skills needed by departmental officers to use ICS guidelines effectively, and scenario practice on how to apply ICS and IMS. The National Incident Management System (NIMS) will illustrate and provide the consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sectors, and non-governmental organizations to work together during virtual all domestic incidents. These course competencies will cover those objectives entailed in NIMS 100, 200, 700, and 800.

FRSC 2170: Fire and Arson Investigation

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Presents an introduction to Fire Investigation. Emphasis is placed upon: fire behavior, combustion properties of various materials, sources of ignition, and investigative techniques for - structures, grassland, wildland, automobiles, vehicles, ships and other types of fire investigation, causes of electrical fires, chemical fires, explosive evaluations, laboratory operation, techniques used in fire deaths and injuries, arson as a crime, other techniques, State and Federal laws, and future trends in fire investigative technology.

HIST 1111: World History I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

HIST 1112: World History II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century.

HIST 2111: U.S. History I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

HIST 2112: U.S. History II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since 1980.

HORT 1000: Horticulture Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces the fundamentals of plant science and horticulture as a career field. Emphasis will be placed on an industry overview; plant morphology; plant physiology; environmental factors affecting horticulture practices; soil physical and chemical properties; fertilizer elements and analysis; and basic propagation techniques.

HORT 1010: Woody Ornamental Plant Identification

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides the basis for a fundamental understanding of the taxonomy, identification, and culture requirements of woody plants. Topics include: introduction to woody plants, classification of woody plants, and woody plant identification and culture requirements.

HORT 1020: Herbaceous Plant Identification

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the identification, selection, and cultural requirements of herbaceous plants. Topics include: introduction to herbaceous plants, plant classification and nomenclature of herbaceous plants, herbaceous plant identification and culture requirements and seasonal color management.

HORT 1030: Greenhouse Management

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course helps to prepare students for a career in the management of commercial greenhouses, conservatories and institutional greenhouses. Emphasis is placed on greenhouse construction; operation and management; regulating and controlling the environment; applying cultural practices as they affect plant physiological processes and influence plant growth and development; and management of a greenhouse business.

HORT 1041: Landscape Construction

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course develops fundamental skills in landscape construction with an emphasis on landscape grading, drainage, retaining walls, and pavements. Topics include workplace safety, site preparation, project layout, construction methods, sequencing, and managerial functions.

HORT 1050: Nursery Production and Management

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Develops skills necessary to propagate and produce both container and field grown nursery stock. Topics include: industry overview, facility design, propagation techniques and environment, field grown and container production, and managerial functions for nursery production.

HORT 1060: Landscape Design

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces design principles, drawing skills, and plant selection techniques required to produce landscape plans for residential/commercial clients. Topics include: landscape design principles, sketching and drawing skills, site analysis, plant and material selection, and landscape design process.

HORT 1070: Landscape Installation

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course develops skills needed for the proper selection, installation, and establishment of landscape trees, shrubs, groundcovers, turf, and flowers. Topics include workplace safety, interpreting a landscape plan, soil preparation, planting methods, post care and establishment, and managerial functions for landscape installers.

HORT 1080: Pest Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course provides an introduction to the principles and mechanisms of integrated pest management across a diverse array of pests including insects, weeds, plant pathogens, nematodes and vertebrates. Specifically, the course will provide students with a fundamental and practical understanding of integrated pest management in a landscape setting with emphasis on pest identification and control; pesticide application safety; and legal requirements for state licensure.

HORT 1120: Landscape Management

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course introduces cultural techniques required for proper landscape management with emphasis on practical application and managerial techniques. Topics include: landscape management, safe operation and maintenance of landscape equipment, and administrative functions for landscape managers.

HORT 1140: Horticulture Business Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course presents managerial techniques required for business success in a chosen horticultural field. All aspects of establishing and managing a small business will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on strategic planning; financial management; marketing strategies; human resource management; and operations and administration.

HORT 1150: Environmental Horticulture Internship

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Provides the student with practical experience in an actual job setting. This internship allows the student to become involved in on-the-job environmental horticulture applications that require practice and follow through. Topics include: work ethics, skills, and attitudes; demands of the horticulture industry; horticultural business management; and labor supervision.

HORT 1250: Plant Production and Propagation

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : HORT 1030, HORT 1050
Corequisite : None
This course provides instruction and hands-on experience in crop production with emphasis on the production of seasonal crops for the local areas and managerial skills involved with crop production. The technical principles of plant propagation focusing on hands-on application are introduced. Topics include cultural controls for propagation and production, insects and diseases, production and scheduling, methods of propagation (seed germination, rooting cuttings, layering, grafting, and budding, tissue culture),and propagation facilities construction.

 

HORT 1310: Irrigation

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Provides students with exposure to the basic principles of hydraulics and fluidics. Special attention is given to watering plant materials in various soil and climatic conditions through the use of irrigation. Topics include: industry overview; fluidics and hydraulics; system design and installation.

HORT 1330: Turfgrass Management

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
A study of turfgrass used in the southern United States. Topics include: industry overview, soil and soil modification; soil fertility; turf installation; turf maintenance, turf diseases, insects and weeds: and estimating costs on management practices.

HORT 1500: Small Gas Engine Repair & Maintenance

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Provides instruction in basic small engine maintenance.  Topics include: engine types; ignition systems; fuel systems; lubrication, filtration, and maintenance; and engine repair.

HORT 1560: Computer-Aided Landscape Design

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Introduces computer aided landscape design techniques and used in landscape design projects. Emphasis is placed on practical application of landscape design processes through use of computer applications. Topics include: software commands; scale and layers operations; and drawing and design.

HORT 1750: Interiorscaping

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None

This course develops students' skills in designing, installing, and maintaining interior plantings. Topics include: an industry overview, environmental requirements, nutrient requirements, maintenance practices, plant disorders, and designs and installations.

HUMN 1101: Introduction to Humanities

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : ENGL 1101 w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : None
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.

MATH 1012: Foundations of Mathematics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Diploma Level Math Scores OR MATH 0090 w/ a "C" or better
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics.

MATH 1100: Quantitative Skills/Reasoning

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Placement Test Score or MATH 0090 AND Program Admission
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.

MATH 1101: Mathematic Modeling

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Math Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

MATH 1111: College Algebra

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Math Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

MATH 1127: Introduction to Statistics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Math Scores
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes the concepts and methods fundamental to utilizing and interpreting commonly used statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing chi square tests, and linear regression.

MGMT 1115: Leadership

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
This course familiarizes the student with the principles and techniques of sound leadership practices. Topics include: Characteristics of Effective Leadership Styles, History of Leadership, Leadership Models, The Relationship of Power and Leadership, Team Leadership, The Role of Leadership in Effecting Change.

POLS 1101: American Government

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : (ENGL 0090 or Test Score) AND (READ 0090 or Test Score)
Corequisite : None
Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

PSYC 1010: Basic Psychology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : None
Corequisite : None
Presents basic concepts within the field of psychology and their application to everyday human behavior, thinking, and emotion. Emphasis is placed on students understanding basic psychological principles and their application within the context of family, work and social interactions. Topics include an overview of psychology as a science, the nervous and sensory systems, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and their treatment, stress and health, and social relations.

PSYC 1101: Introductory Psychology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : (ENGL 0098 or Test Score) AND (READ 0098 or Test Score)
Corequisite : None
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

SOCI 1101: Introduction to Sociology

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

SPCH 1101: Public Speaking

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite : Degree Level Reading and Writing Scores
Corequisite : None
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.